Silver-throated Tanager Tangara icterocephala

  • Order: Passeriformes
  • Family: Thraupidae
  • Polytypic: 3 subspecies
  • Authors: Ashley Lane-Roberts and Kevin J. Burns
Sections

Behavior

Behavior

Locomotion: General behavior is very active and restless (Isler and Isler 1987).
Foraging: This species forages for arthropods on moss-covered branches (Naoki 2003). Observations made in the understory in Costa Rica show that these tanagers feed on the reproductive parts of plants and glean arthropods from surfaces of smaller stems and branches.

Self-maintenance: Skutch (1981) observed Silver-throated Tanagers finding areas such as hollowed-out tree trunks where water has collected in order to bathe themselves.

Territoriality

According to Skutch (1981), these tanagers do not defend any type of territory. In a mosaic of disturbed habitats (coffee plantations and pastures) in Costa Rica, Sekercioglu et al. (2006), estimated the median home range size to be 74 m (range=25-211 m).

Sexual Behavior

Mated pairs of the Silver-throated Tanager can be found year-round, but these bonds seem to become looser after the mating season is over, in November to December (Skutch 1954: 226).

Social and interspecific behavior

Jardins de la Paz, Costa Rica, 10 January 2008, © Seb & JenThe Silver-throated Tanager forages alone or in pairs, and often joins feeding aggregations of mixed-species flocks. As many as 12 Silver-throated Tanagers may occur in the same flock with other species of tanagers, wood warblers, and vireos (Isler and Isler 1987; Skutch 1954 :226). Small intraspecific flocks typically consist of 3-5 birds (Buskirk 1976). Powell (1979) reports an interspecific group size of 1.2 ± 0.3.

Predation

No information.

Recommended Citation

Lane-Roberts, A. and K. J. Burns (2010). Silver-throated Tanager (Tangara icterocephala), version 1.0. In Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/nb.sittan1.01