Multicolored Tanager Chlorochrysa nitidissima

Sections

Systematics

Geographic Variation

There are no recognized subspecies, and molecular divergence or phenotypic variation within C. nitidissima has not been reported (Hilty 2011, Clements et al. 2014, Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Related Species

The Multicolored Tanager (Chlorochrysa nitidissima) was described from Antioquia, Colombia (Sclater 1875). There are no recognized subspecies, and molecular divergence or phenotypic variation within C. nitidissima has not been reported. The Multicolored Tanager is sister to the Orange-eared Tanager (Chlorochrysa calliparaea), with the clade formed by these two species sister to the Glistening-green Tanager (Chlorochrysa phoenicotis), all with strong phylogenetic support (Burns et al. 2014). The monophyly of Chlorochrysa has never been controversial, with many morphological synapomorphies including plumage color, strong tarsi, similarities in bill shape, and distinctive club-shaped orange feathers on the face, as well as aspects of their behavior and geography (Innes 1979, Isler and Isler 1987, Fritz 2013). Subsequently, molecular phylogenetics has repeatedly supported the monophyly of Chlorochrysa (Sedano and Burns 2010, Burns et al. 2014). Traditional classifications grouped Chlorochrysa with Tangara (e.g., Storer 1970, Isler and Isler 1987). Support for this hypothesis came from the observation that both Chlorochrysa and some Tangara have club-shaped feathers (Miller 1919), and Innes (1979) suggested to subsume Chlorochrysa into Tangara. Though molecular phylogenetics has consistently recovered Chlorochrysa within the Thraupinae (which includes Tangara) they are not closely related within this clade (Sedano and Burns 2010, Burns et al 2014). Rather, Chlorochrysa is more closely related to an Andean radiation of mountain tanagers (e.g., Bangsia and Wetmorethraupis) where both males and females tend to be brightly colored (Burns 1997, Burns and Naoki 2004), and more closely related to a group of finch-like tanagers (e.g., the Yellow Cardinal Gubernatrix, the cardinal-tanagers Paroaria, and the crested-finch tanagers) that radiated out of the Andes into the South American lowlands (Sedano and Burns 2010, Burns et al. 2014).

Recommended Citation

Multicolored Tanager (Chlorochrysa nitidissima), In Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. retrieved from Neotropical Birds Online: https://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/Species-Account/nb/species/multan1