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Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus

Hyacinth Macaw

  • Order: Psittaciformes
  • Family: Psittacidae
  • Monotypic

Authors:

Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus

Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil; 5 July 2006 © Joao Quental

The Hyacinth Macaw is the largest parrot in the world and easily one of the most spectacular. It is an enormous bird weighing on average 1.5 kilograms (3.5 pounds) and is completely blue save its dark bill and bare yellow orbital ring and stripe at base of its lower mandible. It is completely dependent on the fruits of a number of palm species and has a necessarily massive bill to aid in the cracking of the tough exterior. Due to its dependence on palm fruit its range is regulated by the presence and abundance of its preferred species and is distributed in north central and south central Brazil into extreme north west Paraguay where it can be found in palm savannas, Mauritia palm stands, open dry woodland, gallery forest and the edge of humid lowland forest.

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Recommended Citation

. 2010. Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus), Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; retrieved from Neotropical Birds Online: http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/species/overview?p_p_spp=53716

This map is based on the maps available from the NatureServe InfoNatura website. The data for these maps are provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE.

  • Migration/Movement:Resident (nonmigratory)
  • Primary Habitat:Gallery forest
  • Foraging Strata:Canopy
  • Foraging Behavior:---
  • Diet:
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  • Nest Form:
  • Clutch: -
  • IUCN Status:Endangered