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Myiozetetes similis

Social Flycatcher

  • Order: Passeriformes
  • Family: Tyrannidae

Authors: Phelan, K.J.

Myiozetetes similis

Coronel Xavier Chaves, Minas Gerais, Brazil; 18 January 2011 © Bertrando Campos

The Social Flycatcher is a widespread and familiar member of the avifauna throughout much of the Neotropics.  It can be quite common near water in forest and edge habitats ranging from northern Argentina north to Mexico.  Similar to other stocky yellow, black and white flycatchers, Social Flycatcher is medium sized with brown upperparts and tail, a short, decurved bill, bold black and white striped head, and yellow underparts that run from the white throat to the undertail coverts.  The species is easily detected, sits out in the open and gives loud, harsh and sometimes chattering calls.

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Recommended Citation

Phelan, K.J.. 2011. Social Flycatcher (Myiozetetes similis), Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; retrieved from Neotropical Birds Online: http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/species/overview?p_p_spp=478316

This map is based on maps available from the NatureServe InfoNatura website, for the distribution in Central America and/or Caribbean, and on a map provided by Robert S. Ridgely, for the South American distribution.

The data for the InforNatura maps are provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE.

  • Migration/Movement:---
  • Primary Habitat:Tropical lowland evergreen forest edge
  • Foraging Strata:---
  • Foraging Behavior:Sally
  • Diet:Fruit
  • Sociality:Solitary/Pairs
  • Mating System:---
  • Nest Form:---
  • Clutch: 2 - 4
  • IUCN Status:Least Concern